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COVID-19 during pregnancy causes fetal and placental inflammation

Pregnant women with COVID-19, the disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, are at increased risk of severe disease and mortality as well as pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia and preterm birth. COVID-19 is therefore particularly dangerous during pregnancy, as both the mother and fetus are... click to read more

  • Derek Miller | Research Associate at Perinatology Research Branch, Division of Obstetrics and Maternal-Fetal Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, and Detroit, USA; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, USA.
  • Valeria Garcia-Flores | Assistant Professor at Perinatology Research Branch, Division of Obstetrics and Maternal-Fetal Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, and Detroit, USA; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, USA.
  • Nardhy Gomez-Lopez | Associate Professor at Perinatology Research Branch, Division of Obstetrics and Maternal-Fetal Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, and Detroit, USA; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, USA.
Views 752
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Jul 28, 2022
Gut bacteria orchestrate the transmission of overweight from mother to babe

Women who are overweight during pregnancy often deliver large babies by cesarean section, who have a greater chance of becoming overweight themselves as they grow older. A popular explanation for this mother-infant transmission of overweight is that the mother vaginally transfers "obesogenic" bacteria to her... click to read more

  • Anita L. Kozyrskyj | Professor at Dept Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, USA
Views 3365
Reading time 3 min
published on Nov 14, 2018
How early-life adversity gets under the skin

Many women experience mental health problems during pregnancy and this can have health consequences for the unborn child. Indeed, a wealth of research findings have now shown that women with depression and anxiety in pregnancy are more likely to give birth prematurely, to have a... click to read more

  • Joanne Ryan | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Murdoch Childrens Research Institute (MCRI), Melbourne, Australia
Views 3912
Reading time 3.5 min
published on May 19, 2016