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Plant Biology

showing 1-5 of 27 breaks

A future of tasty tomatoes

Modern tomatoes have weaker flavor than older heirloom varieties, and consumers often complain about their "tastelessness". But, how did these tasteless tomatoes arise? - one cause is breeding. Tomatoes have been continuously bred to improve their agricultural features. While these features mostly include firmness for... click to read more

  • Denise Tieman | Professor at University of Florida, Horticultural Sciences Dept., Gainesville FL 32611
Views 153
Reading time 3 min
published on Jan 14, 2020
The 10,000-year evolution of pasta food revealed by its DNA

Durum wheat is one of the most important food crops for human consumption in the world, and it is used mainly for pasta production. The origin of this crop dates back to the Neolithic, about 10,000 years ago, in the Fertile Crescent, the cradle of... click to read more

  • Caterina Marè | Role Researcher at CREA-Research Centre for  Genomics  and  Bioinformatics,  Fiorenzuola  d’Arda, Italy
  • A. M. Mastrangelo | Research Officer at CREA-Research  Centre  for  Cereal  and  Industrial  Crops,  Foggia and CREA-Research Centre for Cereal and Industrial Crops, Bergamo, Italy
  • S. Walkowiak | Research Officer at Crop Development Centre and Department of Plant Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
Views 602
Reading time 3 min
published on Oct 18, 2019
Enhancing cassava for better nutrition in every bite

Cassava is a staple food crop in sub-Saharan Africa, where millions of people eat it every day. It's an especially important source of food during times of drought, because cassava is a hardy plant that continues to produce its starchy storage roots when water is scarce... click to read more

  • Nigel J. Taylor | Associate Member and Distinguished Investigator at Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, St Louis, MO, USA
  • Narayanan Narayanan | Research Scientist at Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, St Louis, MO, USA
Views 749
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Sep 17, 2019
High extinction risk for wild coffee species and implications for coffee sector sustainability

It has been estimated that coffee farming provides livelihoods for around 100 million people worldwide, most of which are smallholder farmers. For many coffee producing countries, coffee exports make up a significant and critically important proportion of their export earnings. Despite the number of producers... click to read more

  • Aaron P. Davis | Senior Research Leader at Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Richmond, Surrey, UK
Views 1083
Reading time 4 min
published on Jul 5, 2019
How plants protect themselves from salt stress

We often think of genes as a static piece of information in DNA that determines different physical aspects of life. I have blue eyes because I have the gene(s) for blue eyes. However, while DNA is important in determining such features, it's the proteins encoded... click to read more

  • Steve Anderson | PhD student at Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA
  • Brian D. Gregory | Professor at Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA
Views 975
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Jun 26, 2019