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Evolution & Behaviour

showing 1-5 of 101 breaks

Why so aggressive? Bringing the past into the present

When engaged in a conflict with another, many animals will behave aggressively. We see it in dogs at the dog park, in fish in a fish tanks, in people with bullies at school, and even flies at a garbage bin. However, precisely what motivates an... click to read more

  • Julia Kilgour | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA
Views 160
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Sep 23, 2020
Our ancestors in Africa ate roasted root vegetables 170 thousand years ago

Almost everyone enjoys roasted root vegetables, and our ancestors were no exception. An archaeological team excavated the remains of starchy rhizomes cooked 170,000 years ago in the Border Cave, South Africa. In total, 55 whole charred rhizomes were recovered from the same species - Hypoxis... click to read more

  • Lyn Wadley | Honorary Professor at University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
  • Christine Sievers | Senior Lecturer at University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
Views 264
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Sep 15, 2020
Scrambled frog eggs return to life

When you make scrambled eggs for breakfast, you are probably not expecting any signs of life in the resulting mush, let alone development into chicken embryos. Indeed, it seems common sense that living things are organized structures, and once these structures are jumbled up, life... click to read more

  • Xianrui Cheng | Research Scientist at Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
  • James E. Ferrell, Jr. | Professor at Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
Views 360
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Aug 31, 2020
Processions in Palaeozoic seas

What do ants, processionary caterpillars, birds, apes and football supporters have in common? They all exemplify the huge variety of present-day collective and social behaviours. One of the questions puzzling scientists is whether collective behaviour appeared very early in the evolution of animals or more... click to read more

  • Jean Vannier | CNRS-Researcher at Laboratoire de géologie de Lyon: Terre, Planètes, Environnement, Université de Lyon, CNRS, France
  • Muriel Vidal | Lecturer at Université de Bretagne Occidentale, CNRS, France
  • Robin Marchant | Curator at Université de Lausanne, Musée Cantonal de Géologie, Lausanne, Switzerland
Views 414
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Aug 20, 2020
T. rex growing pains: the king of dinosaurs was first a tyrannical teenager

Without a doubt, Tyrannosaurus rex is the most famous dinosaur in the world. Its adult body length of 40 feet, 5-foot-long head, and bone-crushing teeth are the stuff of legend, but we know surprisingly little about its childhood. What did it look like then? How... click to read more

  • Holly N. Woodward | Associate Professor at Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA
Views 431
Reading time 4 min
published on Aug 13, 2020