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CoV-19

number of breaks: 4

showing 1-4 of 4 breaks

T cells: an essential but neglected component against COVID-19

The current COVID-19 pandemic has brought into our daily conversations scientific topics previously only discussed among scientists in academic environments. When the media inform us about the rise or fall of new cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection in the world, questions about immunity and protection follow... click to read more

  • Antonio Bertoletti | Professor at Emerging Infectious Diseases Program, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore
  • Anthony Tan | Senior Research Fellow at Emerging Infectious Diseases Program, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore
  • Nina Le Bert | Research Fellow at Emerging Infectious Diseases Program, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore
Views 940
Reading time 4.5 min
published on Nov 4, 2020
The evolution of the new coronavirus: what the past teaches us for a better future

As we are writing, the world is facing the global crisis of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Since the beginning of the outbreak, scientists have been struggling with establishing standards to overcome this challenging situation. Unlike for the common cold or the seasonal flu, treatments,... click to read more

  • Akira Ohkubo | PhD student at Department of Cell Biology, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland
Views 2750
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Apr 9, 2020
The Face Mask Dilemma: to wear or not to wear, that is the question

The world has come to a standstill as COVID-19 hits us like a wave. A wave that has been steadily growing ever since the first case was reported in Wuhan, China, at the end of last year. Since there are currently no efficient treatment options... click to read more

  • Reinier Prosee | PhD student at Department of Molecular Biology, Section of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Geneva, Switzerland
Views 3469
Reading time 4 min
published on Apr 6, 2020
Coronaviruses: Contagious Beasts and Where to Find Them

First and foremost: viruses do not appear out of nowhere. They exist in nature moving from one hosting animal to another. Still, we don't realize their presence until they cross our way. For example, the first time a coronavirus was discovered was back in the... click to read more

  • Anatoly Kozlov | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Department of Genetics & Evolution, Section of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Geneva, Switzerland
Views 2851
Reading time 4 min
published on Apr 3, 2020